Destination

South Pacific

Destination Vanuatu Paradise logo
29th edition
        2019

10

 

 

 

An exceptional nature

 

Paradisiac beaches, exceptional underwaters
inviting to dive, a wild and exuberant nature,
active volcanoes...An incredible discovery
that will certainly meet your expectations!
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

10

 

 

Underwater delights

Vanuatu’s reputation in the Pacific for the beauty and diversity of its marine life has been long since established. Its marine fauna could include some 300 varieties of coral and 450 species of fish. 
Snorkelling and scuba diving open up an unforgettable and spectacular scenery

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Several diving outfits offer courses for beginners and for the more
experienced divers, some fabulous
underwater treasures. At Lamen Bay (Epi) and Port Resolution
(Tanna), it is not uncommon to come cross dugongs (seacows).
As for amateurs of game fishing, there is no shortage of choice – bonito, tuna, barracuda, swordfish and marlin abound...

A fairly highly endemic flora

Vanuatu’s flora is characterized by a high level of endemism and includes, within the rain forests, a significant number of plants and trees found nowhere else.

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The vegetation varies considerably
as you move inland from the coast. Mangroves, coconut trees, casuarina, pandanus, sea trumpets  – just to name some of the better known species – abound along the coast. Further inland, towards the heart of the islands, the vegetation thickens and becomes more luxuriant, consisting of whitewood, kaori, banyan, tree ferns, wild orchids and other creepers.

Close to the settlements, an abundance of mango, pawpaw, banana, orange trees... have grown. All around, you can admire masses of trees and shrubs with the most beautiful flowers: hibiscus, bougainvillea, frangipani, flame trees, etc.

The Pacific Boa and good news butterflies. A lot of animals – pigs, chickens, cows, horses… – were
imported by mankind.
Over 121 species of birds have been recorded, a dozen or so of which are endemic to Vanuatu.
There are numerous butterflies in the country, among which the one known as the “good news” butterfly, several endemic insects and a dozen different bats, including the fruit bat.

Reptiles here are not dangerous.
Among the better known, there are geckos, lizards and the harmless Pacific boa.

 

volcanic archipelago

Located in the Pacific Ocean, 540 km to the North-East of New Caledonia, Vanuatu is made up of more than 80 islands and islets, most of them of volcanic origin, with a total area of 12,189 km2 and shaped as an Y tilted to the left. Some 900 km separate the Torres Islands, in the north, from Anatom, in the south.
Since the end of 1994, these islands have been combined into six provinces: Torba, Sanma, Penama, Malampa, Shefa and Tafea.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Situated on the junction line of two continental tectonic plates, on the Pacific Rim of Fire, there are several highly active volcanoes, especially on the islands of Tanna, Ambrym and Lopévi, and some others to a lesser degree. To the east of Epi, when flying low over the sea, you can often detect
bubbling in the water caused by two submarine volcanoes.

An exceptional nature

Paradisiac beaches, exceptional underwaters inviting to dive, a wild and exuberant nature, active volcanoes...An incrédible discovery that will certainly meet your expectations! 

Vanuatu’s reputation in the Pacific for the beauty and diversity of its marine life has been long since established. Its marine fauna could include some 300 varieties of coral and 450 species of fish. 
Snorkelling and scuba diving open up an unforgettable and spectacular scenery.

Several diving outfits offer courses for beginners and for the more experienced divers, some fabulous underwater treasures. At Lamen Bay (Epi) and Port Resolution (Tanna), it is not uncommon to come cross dugongs (seacows).

As for amateurs of game fishing, there is no shortage of choice – bonito, tuna, barracuda, swordfish and marlin abound...

A fairly highly endemic flora

Vanuatu’s flora is characterized by a high level of endemism and includes, within the rain forests, a significant number of plants and trees found nowhere else.

The vegetation varies considerably as you move inland from the coast. Mangroves, coconut trees, casuarina, pandanus, sea trumpets  – just to name some of the better known species – abound along the coast. Further inland, towards the heart of the islands, the vegetation thickens and becomes more luxuriant, consisting of whitewood, kaori, banyan, tree ferns, wild orchids and other creepers.

Close to the settlements, an abundance of mango, pawpaw, banana, orange trees... have grown. All around, you can admire masses of trees and shrubs with the most beautiful flowers: hibiscus, bougainvillea, frangipani, flame trees, etc.

The Pacific Boa and good news butterflies. A lot of animals – pigs, chickens, cows, horses… – were imported by mankind.
Over 121 species of birds have been recorded, a dozen or so of which are endemic to Vanuatu.
There are numerous butterflies in the country, among which the one known as the “good news” butterfly, several endemic insects and a dozen different bats, including the fruit bat.

Reptiles here are not dangerous.
Among the better known, there are geckos, lizards and the harmless Pacific boa.

volcanic archipelago

Located in the Pacific Ocean, 540 km to the North-East of New Caledonia, Vanuatu is made up of more than 80 islands and islets, most of them of volcanic origin, with a total area of 12,189 km2 and shaped as an Y tilted to the left. Some 900 km separate the Torres Islands, in the north, from Anatom, in the south.
Since the end of 1994, these islands have been combined into six provinces: Torba, Sanma, Penama, Malampa, Shefa and Tafea.

Situated on the junction line of two continental tectonic plates, on the Pacific Rim of Fire, there are several highly active volcanoes, especially on the islands of Tanna, Ambrym and Lopévi, and some others to a lesser degree. To the east of Epi, when flying low over the sea, you can often detect bubbling in the water caused by two submarine volcanoes.